The New Maginot Line

Keeping the crib side rail in the lowered position lasted only one day. It got too dangerous because a sleepy, wobbly Trixie was still inclined to stand up and grab for the railing, even though it no longer came up to her chest-level. Instead it cut her off at the knees, acting like a well-designed tripwire. To keep Trixie from catapulting herself onto the floor every time she stood up, we had to take the side completely off. She’s free.

Since we can no longer secure her in the “toddler bed”, we had to fall back to the next defensible position. We bought a door gate last night and have cordoned off her room. This line must hold. It also means that we have conceded that territory. She could spend hours exploring in there in the middle of night (if done quietly) and we’d never know. So, we finally had to baby-proof the room.

Now, I’ve told Jenn for 17 months that I would baby-proof the house, but I never really intended to because it just seemed like a lot of work. I’ve opted instead to actually watch the kid and intervene only when she tries to pry open the bleach with a kitchen knife. However, now that Trixie really, really has her own room, we went through and plugged the outlets, secured the electrical cords, installed toilet seat clamps on everything. You know, the works.

Tonight is her first night sleeping in there. Getting her to go to bed took a little extra work, but after hanging on the gate and howling for fifteen minutes she eventually wandered back over to the bed and crawled in. I was thankful when she finally fell asleep. It’s a little disconcerting to have her creeping around the room in the dark, knocking things over and running into stuff. It sounds too much like something is loose in there, just waiting for the rest of us to go asleep.

This entry was posted in Sleep. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to The New Maginot Line

  1. Jaynee says:

    I hope it goes well with Trixie! As I said in another comment we moved our daughter to a toddler bed just a few weeks ago with much success. Olivia was also really active in the crib (she used all four corners of that thing). However, once in the toddler bed she stopped moving so much and never fell out.

    Our first night using the toddler bed is outlined here (in case anyone wants ideas) – http://www.cootiepie.com/archives/002039.html. We don’t use baby gates – we just close her door. The green light from the monitor we use is a good nightlight and within a few minutes one can see clearly just by that light. She rarely fusses and knows that once I say, “Stay in the bed, good night” that she has to stay in the bed. The only time she gets up is when I DON’T say “Stay in the bed.”

  2. Nicholas says:

    When we took our son out of the crib, we locked him in his room. With a gate he just stood there, shaking it and screaming. A relative suggested turning the door knob around. So as to lock him in. I know, it sounds terrible. For a few night he would go the door and bang on it. Occasionally we would go put him in bed. For these few nights he would fall asleep on the floor in front of the door. Though he quickly learned that bedtime meant staying in your room. He was around 2 at the time. As noted in a previous comment, he only fell out of the crib once.

    We skipped a toddler bed and went right to a double bed with no bedframe. He is so cute taking up 1/16th of the bed.

  3. joe says:

    “Fixed fortifications are a monument to the stupidity of man.” –General Patton, on Maginot

    Just kidding. I don’t think you’ll have a problem holding that line, until she finds a weak spot in your childproofing, or she figures out how to open the gate.

    I’m glad my crib rail suggestion didn’t cause any injury, I would have felt pretty bad otherwise.

  4. DavidNYC says:

    “It’s a little disconcerting to have her creeping around the room in the dark, knocking things over and running into stuff. It sounds too much like something is loose in there, just waiting for the rest of us to go asleep.”

    LOL! That just made me burst out laughing. The idea of a stumbling Trixie wandering around like a miniature figure from Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” is hilarious.